Helpx number 6…. .

So, once again behind with the blog.  I had intended putting out a blog post just before we started our 6th Helpx but alas it never happened.  The German learning kind of took over as I wanted to get through the whole of the Michel Thomas Foundation German before starting on our current Helpx and my brain can only cope with one thing at a time these days.

Time was getting on though as we had been lingering along the Moselle for over a week.  It was time to carry on up to Koblenz and swing a right onto the Rhine.  The sixty five kilometre stretch between Koblenz and Rüdesheim, known as the middle Rhine, is designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Pfalzgrafenstein Castle on an island in the middle of the Rhine built for the sole purpose of generating revenue from boats travelling along the river.  

Although much busier than the Moselle, with a railway line on both sides of the river, it does boast more castles sitting on hillsides overlooking the Rhine.  We based ourselves for a few days at a Stellplatz in Bacharach, a very pretty small medieval town.

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Bacharach.

I think the best way to ‘do’ the Rhine is by boat though as the cycleway is adjacent to the busy road and railway line and it’s not as relaxing as cycling alongside the Moselle.

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Bacharach.
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Campers enjoying the sunset whilst sampling the produce of Wiengut Gehring at Nierstein which also happens to have a lovely stellplatz in the grounds. 

After kicking back for a week on the Rhine cramming our heads with German we arrived at our latest Helpx.  We are staying at a dairy farm near Markelsheim in the Baden-Württemberg region learning all about cows and crops.

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A different kind of commuter vehicle.

The Bayer family has farmed here I think for five generations and are in the process of changing over to organic status.  They should have their organic status by next year and they are the only organic farm in this area.  The farm is in a little village four kilometres away from Markelsheim set in a valley with rolling countryside all around. Every child in the village seems to have their own toy sit-on tractor so very much a farming community.

We’ve been here for over a week now working alongside Mum and Dad Bayer, their two grown up sons, an aussie helper, an American helper, two French helpers and Siegfried the family mascot who isn’t related to the Bayers but who came to live and work at the farm in his early twenties over fifty years ago.  There are also two Polish guys doing some building work and alterations to the cow enclosures.

We’ve had a full on first week with a huge variety of jobs to do.  We’ve helped out with all things cow related like feeding, mucking out, milking, moving cows to different pastures, fencing and the feeding of the calves.

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Feeding time.
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Ten days old.
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Ilsa (Mum Bayer) feeding the calves.

Tim also helped with the birth of a calf which I completely missed as I’d nipped back in to the kitchen to do the washing up.  It was a bit of a drama with the calf having to be pulled into the world with a piece of rope tied around its back legs.  All very James Herriot!

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‘It’s a girl’ – a few minutes old 🙂

Tim has done lots of boy stuff like riding around in the tractor, cleaning one of the barns and cleaning the bathrooms!

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Boys toys.

I’ve been helping Mum Bayer in the kitchen making jams and cooking for everyone on the wood fired range which is no mean feat with the numbers to cater for.  It’s a military operation in that kitchen.

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Cooking homemade Wurst on the wood fired range.

I am in awe of the amount of work that everyone does here.  Aside from the cows the family have 120 acres of crops, some of which need weeding as, being organic, no pesticides can be used.  We’ve been out in the fields pulling up thistles trying to clear them before they flower which has been back breaking work.  If they have flowered they need to be hoiked out and then carried out of the field otherwise there will be even more next year.

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No end in sight.

It is something that needs to be done though whilst converting to organic status and should reduce year on year with the crops rotating but it will always be a continual headache for organic farmers.  The bed in the room we are in is very low to the floor and I have had to roll out of it in the mornings onto my hands and knees!

I will never. Ever. Ever. Ever. E.v.e.rrrrrr. again complain about clearing the small patch of weeds at the front of our house back in Wiltshire.  NOT EVER!  In comparison, I would now see that job as a bit of light entertainment.  Even though it has been hard work it has also been very satisfying being out in the countryside in the sunshine on a completely still evening listening to the skylarks singing above us and seeing the end results of a clean field.

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It seems even cows have bad hair days!

So that’s it folks, our first week down on the farm.  More next week if we survive!

Bis bald!

Meandering along the Mosel…. .

So a break in the weather sees me returning to the blog.  Apart from some rain overnight and the odd shower we have had two glorious weeks of weather here in Germany.  Today, though, it is raining which gives me a chance to catch up on a few things.

We moved on yesterday after having spent a whole week at a stellplatz at Losnich on the Mosel.  We hadn’t planned to stay that long but every evening I found myself saying ‘eine weitere nacht bitte’ to the lady who came to collect the money.  We just didn’t seem to want to leave.  It wasn’t that there was anything exceptional about Losnich it was more that every once in a while it is nice to stay put for several nights.

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The stellplatz at Losnich.  It filled up as the week went on as the weekend was a bank holiday in Germany.

We managed to pick up some free wifi in the village to do some research on a few little projects we have on the go at the moment so for a couple of hours every morning we’d go to ‘the office’ in the village to ‘work’.  ‘The office’ being a couple of benches in the shade set around a fountain.   It might conjure up a nice picture but it wasn’t without its frustrations with the wifi dropping out occasionally or not working at all sometimes but we managed to get a few things done and some info downloaded.  Not least of which was we have organised another Helpx to start next week.  Woop!  This one is going to be a challenge.  Not so much in the work we’ll be doing but the language barrier.  I think only one person in the family speaks English.  With our German being non-existent it’s going to be interesting.  Hence taking advantage of the free wifi to frantically download some language learning material.  We are now on a crash course in learning German.  We need to be fluent by next week or we are doomed!   There’s nothing like a deadline to get me motivated.  More on the Helpx next week.

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Bernkastel-Kues.
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You can volunteer at this former winery just outside Bernkastel-Kues, via the Workaway website, painting antique furniture amongst other things.  It will be opened as a hotel later in 2017.

In addition to our language learning exploits we thought we’d start a new fitness regime to give us a bit of structure to our day and keep us ticking over.  Tim came back from a run feeling mightily pleased with himself but then somehow managed to pull a muscle in his calf right at the end.  I did some circuit type training and got up the next morning feeling like I’d been repeatedly hit by a cricket bat.  After walking around like a pair of cripples for a few days we are probably ready for another go at it if we can summon up the enthusiasm again in this rain.  Watch this space.

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Happy as larry cooking…………something!
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Speed boat event going on at Traban.
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Our first Bratwurst in Germany 🙂

 

In amongst reading, language learning, planning, researching and cooking we have combed the countryside on the bikes and on foot.  It’s a very lush green area dominated by forest and steeply terraced vineyards.  In the last week I have pondered on how the vineyards are maintained being on such steep slopes.  Every scrap of the hillside is utilised for vines.  Even the rocky outcrops don’t go to waste.  My musings were answered whilst out on the bikes cruising the cycle paths along the Mosel.  We watched as a mini caterpillar contraption attached to a tractor was winched up and down the hillside whilst rotavating the land in between the vines as it went.

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The mini digger thing is winched up and down between the vines.

Then, we noticed the metal snakes winding their way at intervals up the steepest slopes.   Aha, kind of a stanner stair lift to transport the workers up the slopes and to get the grapes down from the hills.  Apparently it is called a monorack train.

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A monorack train to transport workers and grapes to and from the vines.

Even with the machinery it still looks like a lot of hard work and labour needed to look after and harvest the grapes.

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We’d have loved to have a go on it but had to make do with just sitting in the chair!

Bremmer Calmont, one of the steepest vineyards in the Europe, at a 68% incline, is right here in the Mosel valley at Bremm.

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On the cycle path looking back towards Bremm.

We just happened to be staying on a stellplatz a few kilometres away from Bremm and we’d seen some walkers traversing the hillside in amongst the Bremmer Calmont vines when we cycled past on our way upriver to take a look at Zell.

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Looking down to Zell.
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That was at least four of my five a day!

We did the walk the following day.  And what a walk it was.  Wunderbar!  It’s only a few kilometres in length but the views are spectacular and there are various interesting obstacles to negotiate along the way.  You’ll see from the pictures it isn’t ideal if you have no head for heights and the warning signs clearly spell that out at the start.

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We had no idea what the walk entailed.

The walk, or climbing trail, as it is called was set up in 2002 as a joint project between the communities of Bremm, Ediger-Eller and Neef.  The German Alpine Association secured the paths with the steel ropes, ladders, stepping brackets and pegs.

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As well as the stupendous views the walk was great fun too.

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Bremmer Calmont vines.
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Did I sign up for mountaineering?

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P1040336.JPGI can’t ever imagine Joe Public being free to roam on such a trail in the UK.  The health and safety police would be all over it before it was even thought of.  Seeing the vines from the path really gives you a feel for what it must take to farm this sort of terrain.

Surprisingly, you can pick up a Bremmer Calmont wine at less than €10 a bottle which is cheap as chips when you consider what it takes to harvest the grapes to get it.  We would have bought some if we could have found somewhere open in the village but everything was as dead as a dodo. It was the day after a national holiday with few people about.  We hadn’t even passed anybody on the walking trail either.  Ah well, maybe next time.

Onwards then to the Rhine or Rhein as we are in Germany.

Bis später!

 

Germany…. .

We arrived in Germany, in the rain, over a week ago.  After twenty four hours of rain the weather significantly improved to become warm and dry.  Then warmer and drier.  Then warmer still.  Then hot.  Then hotter.  Now we are roasting.  I have to keep remembering to turn Tim over every twenty minutes or so to cook him evenly on both sides.  Temperatures for the last few days have been in the thirties.  Just a little too high to be comfortable but we’re not complaining.  It’s a good time to sit in the shade and catch up on this here blog.

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Tim got the honour of putting Germany on the map.

Our plan for Germany is to keep to the southern half as the country is vaaaaast.  Germany is a motorhomers dream destination.  Like the French aires network, Germany has a similar set up with their stellplatzes.  There are thousands of them.   It makes travelling around in a motorhome so easy and we’ve been spoilt for choice.  The ones we have stayed on so far are more like informal campsites and range from €5 to €10 per night.   For the locations they are in I think that’s a bargain.

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Not a bad view for six euros a night.

For example, I’m currently sitting writing this at a Stellplatz on the banks of the Mosel, flanked by steep vineyards, with the odd barge or tourist cruiser quietly chugging past.  Ok I admit, I can hear the traffic from the road on the other side of the river but you can’t have everything.

So, we arrived in Germany and randomly picked out Saarburg as our first stop.  No other reason than it is set on a river where we’d likely be able to get the bikes out for a tootle about.  It turned out to be a good choice.

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Saarburg.
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Saarburg town.

A pretty riverside town boasting not only a Lidl but an Aldi too.  Double the excitement.  Having now done back to back visits of Aldi and Lidl in a few towns since then we have decided we prefer Lidl in Germany as it has a better fresh bread section and some provide dedicated motorhome parking.  It’s Lidl all the way from now on.

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Motorhome parking at Lidl 🙂

Breaking out the bikes in Saarburg we spent a very relaxing few days making the most of the traffic free cycle paths either side of the river in both directions.  We joined hundreds of other people for a cycle event last weekend where the road from Konz to Merzig was closed for ten hours and open only to cyclists, walkers and a few roller bladers.

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Bicycle event along the river Saar.

The whole stretch followed the river.  As with all good events beer tents were set up at convenient points along the way.

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A beer at the end.

We are still fascinated by the barges especially at the locks.  We’ll quite happily spend half an hour watching a barge go through a lock and not get bored.

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Our narrow boats would feel like match sticks in these locks.

We also walked some of the steep wooded hillsides along the river Saar.  We wanted to see the Saar river bend near Mettlach which can be viewed from the hills above it.

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Bend in the Saar.

A huge wooden and steel viewing tower, which looked like it must have been great fun to design and build, enhances the experience.  It will cost you €10 each for that enhanced experience.  Suffice to say we remained on terra firmer with a more than adequate view thank you very much for €0.

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Elaborate viewing tower above the Saar river bend.

Moving on from the Saar we have been moseying on down the Mosel for the last few days.

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Campsite along the Mosel.

Eventually we’ll end up in Koblenz where it runs into the mighty Rhine.  We are firmly onto the Mosel Wienstrasse, or Mosel Wine Road.

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Looking across to Piesport.

It’s the final 195km stretch of the Mosel between Trier and Koblenz and home to some of Germany’s steepest vineyards and best full bodied wines.  We’ve spent the last few nights at a lovely stellplatz at Ensch right on the banks of the Mosel.

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Stellplatz at Ensch.

Despite the heat we’ve cycled twenty or so miles in each direction enjoying picnics whilst wondering how the farmers actually look after and harvest the grapes on such steep hillsides.  I must look that up.

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Just like on those Viking River Cruise adverts!

So far, then, Germany has lived up to our expectations.  We are settling in and learning the German way particularly in relation to recycling plastic bottles, cans and beer bottles.  I was bemoaning the fact that there seemed to be plenty of places to recycle glass and paper but nothing for tins and plastic.  The Germans can do better surely?  It wasn’t until our second visit to Lidl that the penny dropped.  A machine at the supermarket takes any plastic  or glass bottle or can which has a ‘Pfand’ recycling symbol on it and gives you money for it.  25c for each item.  Wow, amazing.

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Returning our plastic bottles and cans.

There must be a catch right?   Of course there’s a catch.  We’d already paid the 25c for each of them in something called the Pfand, or bottle deposit.  Any bottle or can with the Pfand symbol on incurs a deposit of 25c each which is added on to your grocery bill.  Doh!  When you return the empty items in non squashed condition you get that money back at the check out.  Makes you think twice about throwing it in the bin.

Tim was mildly put out about the Pfand after he had thrown away some plastic bottles and a few beer cans in a fit of pique as we couldn’t find anywhere to recycle them and they were becoming a pain stored in the van.  Shouldn’t have been quite so hasty.

Whilst out walking now if I see a bottle with the Pfand symbol on it I’ll pick it up to return on our next visit to the supermarket.  Tim is incredulous.  He probably thinks I’m just one step away from picking up road kill to cook but 25c is 25c and it can go towards the ice-cream Pfund!

Tschüss!

Luxembourg…. .

Luxembourg.  A new country.  A new day.  A new sticker.  A little sticker.

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Luxembourg ready to go on the map!

In our quest to get to Germany……Tim was eager to get to Germany…..we stopped for just one night in Luxembourg.  Being one of the smallest countries in Europe and only thirty five miles across west to east it wasn’t a big drive.  The free aire at Dudelange was ideal as a base to reach Luxembourg City by train.  €4 gets you a ‘day’ ticket lasting until 4am the next morning and can be used on the trains and buses.

It was our first experience of a double decker train.  Clean and efficient.  It was still clean on the way back but not quite as efficient as it was delayed by thirty minutes.  But we’re used to that.   Waiting for trains was one of Tim’s not so favourite sports before giving up his job last year.

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Double decker train into Luxembourg city.

Having arrived to the city in a bit of a grump (no other reason than it was a grey day…………it doesn’t take much for me) Luxembourg soon won me over.  Over one third of the surface of the city is made up of beautifully landscaped green spaces.

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Luxembourg is very green.

Its situation is pretty spectacular perched on high cliffs lying above two narrow valleys carved by the rivers Alzette and Pétrusse.

P1040116.JPGThe old town and the fortifications were designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994.  It really is worth a visit.

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Palace of the Grand Dukes, fully restored from 1992 to 1995.

We picked up two walking trail leaflets from the tourist information which would guide us round the old town, the fortress walls and the best views.  However, my Poundland reading glasses were no match for the tiny map on the back of one of the leaflets.  Tim took over, scanned the map, gave it back and we did our own walking tour instead.

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Looking over the Grund (lower town)

The old town is pretty compact so fairly easy to navigate and The Grund (lower town) is wedged in between the fortifications so hard to get lost.

P1040118.JPGEven though the higher old town was heaving with people the lower town, by comparison, was like being in an oasis of calm.

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Hardly anyone was in the lower town.

Trees, formal and informal gardens, riverside paths, fortifications and parkland.

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River Alzette.

I’m presuming that most visitors don’t venture down to the lower town, even though there is a lift, as it was very quiet.

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The old blending with the new – this, as far as we could see, was a nursing home.  The views were spectacular.

So that was our whirlwind trip to Luxembourg.  We may well hop back over the border again as diesel is cheaper there than in Germany or visit Northern Luxembourg on our way back to the UK next year.

Gutt neucht!

 

Boat-lifts and barges in Belgium…. .

L’Ascenseur furniculaire de Strépy-Thieu, before it was trumped by the Three Gorges Dam in 2016, was the largest boat-lift in the world. We thought it would be interesting to take a look. At just over 100 metres high and 135 metres long it is a monster.

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Strepy-Thieu boat-lift.

By the 1960’s the four existing hydraulic boat lifts, built in the late 1890’s and early 1900’s, were no longer sufficient to accommodate the larger barges that were by then plying the canal network. A program of modernisation was needed. Taking twenty years to build the lift was finally unveiled in 2002 and can accommodate barges of up to 1350 tonnes.

The Voies d’Eau du Hainaut website entices you with the words ‘climb up through the core, all the way up to the panoramic viewing point at the top where you can experience the “Land of Genius” interactive tour’. We were not to be enticed. After seeing a barge enter the lift at the bottom we frantically scrambled up the steep bank to see it exit at the top. It’s cheaper that way. Genius!

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Out comes the barge at the top.

Parked right on the edge of the canal at the free aire at Thieu we spent three days cycling and walking the canal.

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The aire on the canal at Thieu.

Designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site the four ‘old’ boat lifts were a much more photogenic affair than the new one.

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Boat-lift number 3.

Spaced out over seven kilometres each boat lift hauls its cargo up or down 15-16 metres. They are still in their original working condition.

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Boat-lift number 1 in the foreground and number to beyond.

Tim extolled on the quality of the rivets and the craftsmanship of the build. Not being an engineer myself I can’t really comment but it all looked pretty sturdy to me.

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Odd to see a flock of goats on a housing estate?!

Even though Belgium hasn’t been up there for spectacular landscape it has got some excellent traffic free cycle paths. 15km along the canal took us into Mons.

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Mons.

We didn’t go specifically to see Mons as we were after a bit of peace and quiet really but we had to find somewhere to print off a couple of documents to get posted back to the UK.

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The Bell Tower at Mons.

Job done the round trip took about three hours. It is nice to have the time to take three hours to print and post a letter though.

Twenty kilometres further up the canal we stopped to take a look at the Ronquières super lock completed in 1968. It’s not a lock as such more a kind of boat slide. Stretching 1.4km in length it is quite a sight. The boat motors into a type of lock which is then winched, on rails, up or down the 68m hill.

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Ronquieres super lock/lift/slide.

We arrived expecting to be able to walk along a tow path alongside it but were disappointed that it can only be seen from the bottom, halfway up or at the top. Also there wasn’t a boat to be seen so we didn’t see it in action.

We nipped back over the French border to stop for a few days at Givet as I thought we could cycle to Dinant along the river Meuse from there. We parked up at the ‘unofficial aire’ on the opposite side of the river from the town. The official aire, a ten minute walk away, was full of plant machinery for some refurbishment that was going on.  I don’t think anyone uses it though.

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Givet, France.

I asked at the tourist information whether they had a route map for a cycle to Dinant. Unfortunately, as Dinant is in Belgium it’s not their remit to provide guides for anything across the border but I could have a lovely spiral bound glossy guide to the Voie Verte going south along the river on the French side.  Oh, Ok.  So we went south down the Meuse towards Fumay instead.

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The view from Chooze village on the cycle path.  So picturesque but there is a nuclear power plant on the other side of the village!

Along the way we happened upon a rather large group of youngsters on an outing with just two adults in charge and nary a high viz vest in sight. They’d never get away with it in the UK 😉

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A gaggle of  over forty goslings 🙂

We’d never seen anything like it before counting at least forty two goslings being led by two adult geese. I later googled it and was surprised to learn that goose crèches are fairly common. An article in the Daily Mail does say though that forty is exceptional. It made my day seeing them 🙂

Not being able to find a suitable traffic free route along the Meuse to Dinant we drove instead.  Quite a lot of the route followed the edge of the Meuse and was very picturesque.  We were into the Ardenne region which is full of gently rolling hills, forests and quiet roads.  Quiet roads, that was, until we got to Dinant where every man and his dog seemed to be driving through.  Our guidebook describes Dinant as ‘picture-postcard’ which it kind of is except for all that noisy traffic.

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Dinant, birthplace of Adolph Sax, inventor of the saxophone.

We didn’t have the relaxing stroll we were hoping for and spent just an hour there.   Adolph Sax, inventor of the saxophone, was born in Dinant so with Tim being a sax player it was a chance to get the obligatory photo outside where the inventor was born.

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Outside the tiny Adolph Sax museum.

There is a free tiny museum to look around but it isn’t much to write about and the interactive commentary was drowned out by the constant traffic rumbling past outside.

We stopped overnight at the free aire behind the fire station at Arlon which is in the Province of Luxembourg but in Belgium and where many residents apparently speak Luxembourgish.  Mmm weird, but then Belgium has a curious mix of languages in different areas with predominantly Flemish (similar to Dutch) spoken in the northern region of Flanders, French spoken in the southern region of Wallonia and a teeny German speaking area in the eastern province of Liege.  Add in the Luxembourgish and all the different dialects and it all gets a little bit complicated!

We went out for a couple of Belgian beers and I ordered them in French.  So far so good.  On the second round I asked the lady ‘Qu-est ce-que vous recommendez?’  She started to reply in French and seeing my blank expression morphed into what sounded like German and then what appeared to be Dutch?  I just said ‘yes’ to what she had suggested to keep things simple.  What came out was not a beer at all but a kind of homemade wine or punch with a bit of orange floating on the top.  And foul it was too!  When I paid she said she thought we were Dutch which explained a lot!

Anyway, next up Luxembourg.

Au revoir.  Auf wiedersehen.  Vaarwel.  Ӓddi!

On the road again…. .

So, after just over three weeks back in the UK seeing family and friends and sorting out various bits and pieces that needed sorting like giving away all our possessions (!) we are back on the road for Season 2 of our tour.   I just want to say a big thank you to all our family and friends for taking the time to meet up with us.  It was lovely to see everyone on our whirlwind of a tour and we’ll look forward to doing it all again next year!

So what’s the plan this year?  This year is going to be a bit different as we are going into new territory now!  Queue drum roll.  Not being ones to make any rash decisions we were pretty cautious when we first set sail for France in May 2016.  For our first extended foray into Europe we just planned to tour through France, Spain and Portugal to get a feel for long term travel in countries well set up for motorhomers.  Even though neither of us had visited Spain before (in our adult lives) we’d already been to France several times (in the van) and Portugal a few times (flying) so we felt we were squarely in our comfort zone.

We’ve had a loose plan for this year in our heads for some time but I have been somewhat lacking on the planning front of pin pointing exactly where we’ll go.  I say me because that’s my job as part of Team Ollie.  I do the planning, Tim does the driving.  We travelled down to Dover from Yorkshire ten days ago to catch an overnight ferry to Dunkirk.  After a quick flit to Aldi to stock up on this year’s tea bag supply I thought it would be a good idea to maybe have a look at the guidebooks and maps to start planning our route for this year.  A bit late maybe but…..what can I say?…….I’ve been busy with other things!  The beauty of travelling in a motorhome though is that, well, you don’t really need a plan as such.

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Tea bag stash 2017!

Driving off the ferry at Dunkirk we could choose to go left, right, or straight on, whatever, it doesn’t really matter.  However, the very loooooose plan is to travel through Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Slovenia and Croatia to eventually end up in Greece for the winter with a few stops for some volunteering via Helpx along the way if it fits in.  That’s as detailed a plan as I have got at the moment though!

I’d been perusing the guide books looking for an interesting route down to at least Germany as a start but was feeling pretty overwhelmed with information overload.  It seems to be taking my little brain forever just to get my head around the lie of the land so to speak.  I did, at one point, throw up my hands and bleat to Tim that maybe he could plan a route for a change.  After pointing out to me, in addition to all the driving, the 101 different van related tasks he undertakes as his part of Team Ollie, including the dreaded toilet emptying, I thought it prudent to wind my neck in and go back to the guide books!

Our first stop, then, was just across the Belgian border at Ypres.  There’s a very good aire a fifteen minute walk from the town centre which costs a very reasonable €8 per night inclusive of electricity.  Before we went rushing off into town, though, it was time to break out a shiny new sticker for our map of Europe on the side of the van.  It’s been a long time coming as the map hasn’t been added to since we crossed the border into Portugal back in September last year.  Yay, Belgium, new country.  We are sooo easily pleased!

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Belgium goes on the map.

On first sighting the town centre of Ypres (or Ieper as it is also known) you’d be fooled into thinking that all the buildings date back hundreds of years.  Not so.  The centre of the town, which served as the Allied communications centre, and within range of German artillery, was completely razed to the ground by shelling in the First World War.  The citizens had to be evacuated in 1915 but returned after the war determined to reconstruct their town.  The reconstruction, which took twenty years, is remarkable.  It really is hard to believe that the Lakenhalle (old cloth hall) and the Cathedral are less than 100 years old.

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The Lakenhalle (cloth hall) at Ypres.
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Tucking in to a tasting tray.  Well we are in Belgium after all!

You can’t come to this area of Belgium and not be moved by the reminders of the Great War.  World War I cemeteries, monuments and memorials pepper the towns and surrounding countryside.  The Menin Gate war memorial has engraved upon it the names of fifty thousand British and Commonwealth troops who died in the Ypres Salient but who have no grave.

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The Menin Gate War memorial.

The Last Post is sounded every evening at 8pm under the memorial.  We joined another 2000 or so people that evening to pay our respects.

Consulting our Camper Connect App we found Lesaffre Escargot, a France Passion site, just back over the border in France, where we would be able to take the bus into Lille.  Even though we’re not members of France Passion the site accepts non members at €5 per night and €3 for electricity.  We got a warm welcome from the owner and it was a chance to use that rusty French that I have let slip over recent months.  Oh dear!  I have forgotten so much of it that I am making a conscious effort again to relearn what has drained away.  Goldfish must be a part of my DNA I think.

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Lesaffre Escargot France Passion site.

The little campsite is really nicely laid out, set in quiet countryside and is a 15 minute walk to the bus stop so a perfect base for a few days.  The owners raise their snails in poly tunnels and sell various snail related produce in their little farm shop.  We had a peek into a couple of the poly tunnels to see the snail nursery with the inmates, looking exactly like the snails you’d find in your garden at home, fattening themselves up over a period of 5-6 months for their eventual fate.  Snails being ugly and slimy aren’t really our thing so we weren’t tempted into buying any of the produce.  Our dogs, who were real scavengers and would eat anything, even drew the line at snails and wouldn’t touch them!

Lille was easily reached by the bus which took about 45 minutes and only set us back €3.60 return each.   So much easier and less stressful that driving.  Lille, unfortunately, didn’t really capture our hearts though.

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Lille.

Oh it was nice enough in the old town but lacked something I couldn’t quite put my finger on and sitting here now, writing this, I still can’t!  It just didn’t have the wow factor that we’d seen in Seville, Granada and Valencia I suppose.  Lots of the old town is made up of chic boutiques and as we don’t do either chic or boutique it didn’t really do it for us.

We ended up wandering around aimlessly not really having any direction so called it a day after a couple of hours and returned to the campsite to make the most of the afternoon sunshine.

To counter our disappointment of Lille we had a day of biking to get out into the fresh air. We picked up a cycleway in the pretty town of Comines which follows the canal towards Lille. We whiled away some time watching the huge barges trundling past.

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Barges in Belgium are just slightly bigger than our Narrow boats!

Went past a bijou little campsite.

 

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Glamping site next to the canal.

And were chased off by these geese!

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These geese wanted us off their patch!

Right, I’m going to quit now whilst I’m ahead as we’ve had little or no free wifi since we left England and it has taken an age getting these photos uploaded and my battery is almost flat!  Such is the life of a vagabond!

A bientôt!

Finally letting go…. .

It won’t have escaped the notice of the handful of regular readers to this blog that I have been having somewhat of a blog sabbatical over the last few weeks.  The reasons for this have been many and varied.  It’s been a bit of an emotional time returning to the normal and the familiar after a year away and I’ve found it harder than I expected.  After all, we’ve been living in a little bubble for the last twelve months not needing to make many decisions beyond the day to day perusing of the guidebooks and maps deciding on where to go and what to do.  Simples.  Few stresses, other than narrow roads and manic drivers.

Coming back though, alongside seeing family and friends, I knew we would have to confront a few things that, well, needed confronting!  Our intention when we left on our adventure, over a year ago, was to see it as a lifestyle change and something we would continue to do for a few years at least if not longer.  However, being cautious by nature we didn’t burn all our bridges by selling up in the UK and getting rid of all our stuff before we left.  Oh no, that ‘just in case’ refrain was always in the back of our minds when deciding what to do.  Even though we had donated and given away lots of our possessions before we left we still kept a significant amount of it stored in a container whilst our house is rented out, you know,  ‘just in case’.

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Here we are again revisiting the question of ‘our stuff’!

‘Just in case’ living in a small space got too much and we wanted a UK base to return to.  ‘Just in case’ we fell out of love with the lifestyle and wanted to resume ‘normal’ life again.  ‘Just in case’ we both fell out with each other completely and we could enjoy a mud fight over who was having what on our separation (that’s not going to happen by the way as poor Tim signed up to a life sentence a very long time ago)!  You get the picture.

So, I’m back here again after a whole year still talking about ‘stuff’.  Stuff, stuff, stuff.  I won’t be offended if you skip over this post, bored, having read my musings before about ‘stuff’ because, frankly, I am bored too.  If ‘procrastination’ was an Olympic sport I’d be lining up there in Tokyo, 2020!  But, procrastinate, justify, philosophise, reason, dillydally, put off, postpone, defer, call it what you will, a decision had to be made about what to do with our ‘stuff’.  End of.

So it all went.

Poof!

Just like that.

 

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The final letting go!  It’s gone.

We called Dorothy House, a local charity which has provided excellent end of life care in the past to Rita, one of our very good friends, and to Eve our elderly neighbour, and they kindly took the whole lot yesterday in one fell swoop.  The money we save in storage costs will now be invested in our future life instead of continually paying for our past life.

The key to the container has been returned and a weight has been lifted.  We don’t have to revisit the ‘stuff’ question again.  Ever!   Draw a line Jane.  Draw. A. Line.  __________!

Until next time!