Meanwhile back at Alpaca HQ…. .

So, it’s been alpaca mania for the last three weeks with all forty two of them keeping us busy and entertained.  Making sure the alpaca family has enough pasture to sustain them is always a constant headache for Georg and Silke our hosts.   With increasing numbers year on year they are always on the look out for new fields.  Five alpacas will generally need at least an acre between them depending on the quality of the pasture.

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One of the group of twelve boys.

The four Lindforst Alpaca groups are currently rotated round eleven different pastures of varying sizes I think but with the extra little ones born this year they are in need of more.

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Hippi and the girls.

Georg breathed a sigh of relief after he had managed to secure a huge area of land owned by the church, with the bonus of a barn, which could be split into two different areas.  The plan was to move Sancho and his girls to the new area.  Excellent.  Slight problem though, it all needed to be fenced.  Aaaargh.  It was a bit of a beast of a job.  Old fence needed to be taken out and areas cleared and strimmed and the barn needed a good clean.  It took Tim and Georg over a week of furious work to complete the first area.

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Tadah……..the new fence.

Then it was just a case of moving Sancho and his nineteen girls to their new home………………..in the car……………………four or five at a time…………………trying to match up the right cria with the right mother (not easy)…………..with a few escaping (just as well they have a strong herding instinct)…………..much alpaca humming…………..and spitting………..oh yes………green spitting.    To be fair there was just one culprit doing the spitting, Philly.  Apparently she’s always like it.  Aymeric (French helper) suffered the worst of it.  Just as well he wears glasses.  I’m sure that green spit must burn one’s eyeballs!  Fortunately, once she was in the car she was like a little lamb and more interested in what was outside the window than with us.  It took three of us three hours to get the whole family moved and I’m not sure who was more relieved when it was done, us or the alpacas.

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There we go, plenty of room.

Three days later they escaped!  An early morning phonecall from a local farmer notified Georg that seventeen alpacas were loose.  After safely rounding up the seventeen escapees we found three were still in the field.  One had her head and leg stuck in the fence.  She must have thrashed about a bit trying to free herself causing a big gap in the fence for the others to make their escape. Livestock, they do keep you on your toes.  Since starting this Helpx lark we have rounded up pigs in France, donkeys in Portugal and cows and alpacas in Germany.

With the fence repaired and Sancho and his girls safely back behind it the second area needed to be fenced.  Fortunately for Tim two new helpers, Geuwen and Elyes, who had arrived the day before, were earmarked for that job.  We now know why farmers end up with hands the size of shovels as after several days of banging in fence posts and the like Tim’s hands were twice their normal size.  He was glad to have a break from it and busied himself instead with fixing things.  He had quite the little outside workshop set up.

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Tims outdoor workshop.

Over the last few weeks he’s pottered about happy as larry tinkering with things.  Silke did comment that it was the first time they’d had a helper who was able to fix things.  She said they normally break everything!

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The sack trucks are now in working order.

It’s been a lot of work here though with a thousand and one things to do.  The animals alone (ducks, geese, chickens, alpacas and dogs) take two people four to five hours of work a day sorting out their food, clearing the pens and pastures, topping up their water, replenishing their hay and driving to where they are.  Our time here has been full on with other tasks thrown into the mix beyond animal care and fencing (painting, strimming, clearing, weeding, digging, fixing, watering, cleaning, tidying, pruning, harvesting). Then after lunch more of the same!!

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Akira, therapy dog and all round good egg!

We’ve enjoyed all the tasks we’ve done though and I have especially loved looking after the alpacas, spending time with them everyday observing how they behave and enjoying their antics.

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Eena devil dog therapy dog in training at thirteen weeks old 🙂

Their fleeces are used to make socks, hats and duvets (alpaca fleece is not greasy like down so they are suitable for people with allergies) which our hosts sell at events, shows and on the internet.

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The ‘shop’ set up at the local ‘Herbfest’ in the village nearby.

Our time here, though, has come to an end and we are looking forward to pastures and countries new.  Thank you to Georg and Silke for hosting us and to all the other helpers who have been here at various times throughout our stay.  Our plan now is to leave Germany via Passau and go on into the Czech Republic.  From there we’ll travel through Slovakia, Hungary and Slovenia to reach Croatia but, once again, time is running away with us and we need to get a move on if we are to chase the sun.

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L-R…Pirin, Anna, Georg, Amyeric, Elyes, Geuwen, Silke, Me, Tim.  

Auf Wiedersehen auf Deutschland!

Straubing Volksfest…. .

Munich’s Oktoberfest is not only Bavaria’s biggest festival but it is by far and away the largest and most well known annual festival in Germany which attracts over six million visitors every year from near and far.  We will have moved on and left Germany way before October and, if I’m honest, Oktoberfest is probably a bit too big for our liking.  Whilst at Alpaca HQ, though, Georg and Silke (our hosts) took us to the opening evening of the Volksfest in nearby Straubing, the second largest festival in Bavaria behind Oktoberfest.

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The local area around Straubing is known as the ‘Gauboden’, hence the name.

The Volksfest is a big deal in these here parts.  Lots of businesses close down for the whole of the festival and many local people take the week off work so they can go to ‘Volksfest’ everyday. So, yes, a big deal for the local people.  It’s open for ten days and practically everyone dresses in their traditional outfits to enjoy a good old knees up Bavarian style.  We were definitely the odd ones out in our ‘normal’ clothes.

It kicked off on the Friday evening with the ‘Volsfestauszug’.  Over 3000 participants, dressed up in over eighty different national costumes, paraded through the streets of Straubing with horse-drawn carriages, oxen, classic tractors and cars, dance and music groups.

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The ‘Bier Frau’.
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No Bavarian festival would be complete without an ‘oom-pah’ band.
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All the horses were huuuuge!

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One of the many brewery floats.

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The bizarre walking Christmas tree made us laugh.

After the parade everyone wandered down to the festival site set on the banks of the Danube for an evening of beer, fairground rides, beer, traditional Bavarian music, beer, traditional Bavarian food, beer, amusement activities, beer, singing, beer, storytelling, beer and, um, more beer.

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The ‘civilised’ tent for us oldies.

We got talking to a German couple who told us that many people will spend at least a month’s wages at the volksfest every year.  That’s not surprising as the beer was €9.30 per litre and the food is pretty expensive too but, as there is no entry fee for the volksfest, we were happy to pay it.

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We looked so out of place in our ‘pac-a-macs!’

They also told us that the marquee that we were in was the ‘civilised’ one where the food was really good and the music was more traditional.  Looking around most of the occupants were over 50+ so we were in good company.

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Carrying the litre steins of beer seemed to be a good form of weight training – some managed four or five in each hand.

Later we wandered around some of the other marquees which were definitely more rowdy but good fun and what we imagined a traditional Bavarian festival to be like.

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The ‘young-uns’ marquee where we looked even more out of place!

So, if you are looking to experience a traditional Bavarian festival and something more low key than Oktoberfest then we can thoroughly recommend the Straubing Volksfest.

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Prost!

Bis zum nächsten mal.

Alpaca HQ….

I can count on one finger the number of times that I have got out of bed on a Sunday morning to be greeted by a shiny new baby alpaca (cria) complete with the wrapping paper still attached.

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A shiny new cria…..

Meet the latest new addition to the Lindforst Alpaca Team.  Expected since April, this baby has been a long time coming.  The baby was to be called Mañana if it had been a girl but as it was a boy he has been named Mañano.

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…..still in it’s wrapping paper!
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Picking up the after birth………..that’ll be a job for Tim then!

So with Mañano now the last cria to be expected this year I think he takes the team up to a total of forty two Alpacas.

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And here is Manano all dried, fluffed up and lovely.

They are kept in four different groups.  We have Sancho and his seventeen girls.  Herbert and his five girls.  A group of six girls.  And my personal favourites ‘the boys’, eight young boys and four castrated boys.

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One of the young boys.

DSC03267.JPGIt’s a full time job looking after them all but a thoroughly enjoyable full time job.  We’ve learnt so much about them in the week we have been here observing how they interact with one another.

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An extra feed for the new Mum in Sancho’s group.

They are endearing, curious, gentle herding animals with a wonderful communication system and such a super soft fleece.  Being herding animals they are in constant communication with each other.  They really are very vocal in a quiet sort of way.  They hum, cluck, spit and snort at each other for varying different reasons.  It’s hard to explain what the hum sounds like so if you are interested you can hear it here on this YouTube clip.

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Alpacas are such gentle creatures – very safe for adults and children.  We took four of the boys to a local fete last Sunday.  Here is Georg introducing his ‘boys’ to the children.

For me, I find it very calming listening to the quiet background humming of the Alpacas.  The humming, though, is generally associated with the alpaca feeling curious, distressed, anxious, bored, too hot, too cold, nervous or stressed.  Whilst we are working amongst them feeding, watering and clearing their poop up they are constantly humming to each other.  I guess they are alert and wary to our presence.

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Such handsome boys:)

Herbert and Sancho need to be tethered as we go about our daily chores as they can become aggressive protecting their herd.  Even though I’ve been told that Alpacas are easy animals to care for they are a little bit needy and fragile.  For example, they don’t really show any signs of illness until they have all four legs in the air so owners need to be constantly vigilant about any subtle changes in behaviour of their animals.  And that poop picking.  Oh yes, it needs to be done.  Every. Single. Day.  Cleaning up after them helps control parasites and worm related health problems.

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Tim doing his alpaca impression whilst taking the boys out for a ride in the car!

The alpacas will generally  ‘go’ en masse in the same two or three areas of their pasture which does make it a little easier to pick up but you’ll always find several ‘rogue’ piles around and about too.  Not to go into too much detail here about the size and consistency of Alpaca poop but it’s a bit like rabbit droppings or chocolate coated raisins and it needs to be raked out of the grass.  Yup, every last drop.  Or as near to it as you can get.

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Moving Sancho’s girls to a new pasture.

But enough about the poop.  A question often asked is ‘do they spit?’  Well, yes they do spit.  And at point blank range.  But not often.  I wised up pretty quickly on their body language and why and when they are about to spit after being pebble dashed from a spitting Alpaca with a mouthful of food.

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Are we nearly there yet?

They have several different types of spitting technique too.  We have the ‘dry spit’ which is just fresh air.  As already mentioned, we have the ‘food spit’ and finally we have the ‘get away from me I am very angry spit’ or otherwise known as ‘the green spit’.  Now this one is really not one you want to be on the receiving end of.  This one is serious and contains regurgitated stomach contents.  And boy does it smell.  I’ve seen two alpacas having a spat, or should I say spit, and the smell is horrendous.  They’ll spit at each other as a warning to stay away or at displeasure to another’s behaviour.

It is lovely to just watch and observe them seing how they interact and care for each other.  When the new cria was born the whole herd gathered around the Mum and baby to have a good sniff and to help protect them.  So sweet 🙂

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Caring alpacas.

More from Alpaca HQ next week.

Auf Wiedersehen!

A deluge on the Danube…. .

All good things come to an end.  That includes the weather.  Our recent run of scorching weather came to an abrupt halt sometime last week.  Don’t ask me which day it was as I never know what day it is now.  Whatever, the rain came.  The tranquil scenes along the Danube went from this…….

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The Danube before the deluge.

to this……..

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The Danube after a few days of rain.

…..and we were van bound for a few days.  Did we get out on that nice easy scenic cycle? Nope.  Did we do any amazingly scenic walks?  Nope.  Did we see any interesting sights?  Nope.  Well, maybe a few.

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The historic town of Berching.

 

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The excellent stellplatz at Berching.

With plenty of time on our hands the wonders of the internet are always welcome to keep us busy with all our little projects that get our undivided attention when rain stops play.  Queue the Rewe supermarket chain.

 

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Google image of Rewe supermarket.

We’d discovered their supermarkets have free wifi.  And, joy of joys, it reaches the van in the carpark.  Excellent.  The excitement, chez Ollie, was palpable!  We wiled away a happy few hours a day at the Rewe supermarket carpark surfing and downloading to our hearts content.  Ah, but not just the same carpark everyday.  Oh no.  To keep it all fresh and exciting we went to a different Rewe supermarket in a different town each day.  Yep, we sure know how to live.  To pay Rewe back for their hospitality and lovely superfast free wifi we did do our daily shop there.  It’s a win-win.

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Regensburg cathedral.
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A lovely knitted bike in Regensburg.

But with the scorching hot weather now restored let’s cut to the chase on what we are up to now.  We arrived a few days ago at our latest Helpx assignment deep in eastern Bavaria.  Oh, this is a bucket list item this one.  Well, it is for me.  We’ve gone from Donkey HQ to Dairy HQ and we are now at Alpaca HQ!  When first discovering what Helpx , Workaway, and Wwoofing was all about a few years ago, Donkeys and Alpacas were right up there on my list of ‘fun’ animals to get up close and personal with so to speak.  They had to feature during our travels.  So here we are with the Lindforst Alpaca Team.  I think there are about thirty seven of them but over the coming weeks we’ll get to know them better and learn all about caring for them.

So, without further ado, I’ll introduce you to the ‘Lindforst Alpaca Team’.

Tada…….

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Sancho (left) and his girls.
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Rosanna, the latest addition to the team.  Here she is just one day old:)
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The young ones taking a nap.
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Ah, the joys of Alpaca Poo Picking!

In the coming weeks you’ll get to meet more of them.

Bis dann!