Settling in to routines…. .

Ok, so we felt we needed a break from vanlife to remain in one place for a while.  But what are we going to do during our static four months with so much time on our hands?  Certainly this lifestyle we have has given us the luxury of time.  Time to do as we please, live our life on our own terms and pick and choose what we want to do and what we don’t want to do.  I can’t deny it’s a super luxurious position to be in and it’s one we try not to take for granted.  Having so much time though also throws up a few challenges.  At least for me.  Tim is a much more laid back, live in the moment, don’t analyse it kind of person.  Me?  I can analyse something to the nth degree and then some!

I’m not talking about boredom here.  I’ve never been bored on our travels.  Yes, there have been times where I’ve felt flat, frustrated or cooped up during prolonged periods of rain but I wouldn’t say I’ve been bored.  I’ll always find something to do.  Pottering. It’s one of my favourite things to do but I’m not yet quite of an age where pottering about ALL day is fulfilling enough.  Maybe in a year or two;)  For me, the amount of time we have on our hands is more a question of purpose.  Throughout our travels I’ve always been plagued by the ‘P’ word.  Or maybe there’s a bit of guilt thrown in there too.  Drifting around from place to place with no end game in mind can, for me, feel a bit like I have no purpose.  I think I’m just the kind of person that needs a bit of structure and a ‘why’.  It was one of the reasons we had decided that as part of our travels we would do some volunteering.  We viewed it as a chance to meet new people, learn new skills, experience different lifestyles and ideas and generally make a difference to someone.  It was also a chance to have a focus for a while.

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Painting the railings of the village War Memorial whilst on a Helpx in France in 2016.

It can be difficult to have a focus when you’re moving from place to place for an extended period of time.  It can also be difficult to justify what we are doing.  Lots of people nowadays take a midlife gap year which is totally understandable. Take a year or so out, explore, recharge and then pick up from where you left off.  People can understand that.  But take off with no idea of how long you’ll be gone for or if you’ll ever go back to a conventional life is a bit harder for people to take in.  If we meet people and get into a discussion on our current lifestyle we have occasionally had the awkward question of ‘yes, but what do you do all day’? If I’m honest it’s not an easy one to answer without sounding a bit lame.  It generally goes something like this: ‘Oh well, you know, we walk a bit, maybe go for a cycle, plan where to go next, sort out emptying and refilling the van, read, erm, go to Lidl, volunteer a bit, erm, you know, erm, stuff like that’.  You see.  Wishy washy and lame.  You can see in people’s eyes they don’t really get it and are probably thinking we’re just a bit work shy.  I think it’s partly an age thing as if we were in our late sixties or seventies I don’t think anyone would question what we do with our time.  You’ve earnt your retirement so live it large and put your feet up.  Or maybe it’s just my own perception of things.  I don’t know but it’s not always easy to justify what we do with our time and where it all goes. But it goes.  And very quickly too.  Filling the time whilst on the road in the van is pretty easy though as you’re constantly stimulated by new sights, different landscapes, a changing set of neighbours, the odd challenge and hundreds of questions going through your head about this and that.  Filling the time in one place though is a bit different.

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Where does the time go?!

So, after nearly seven hundred words I’ve still not answered what we’ll be doing during our extended time here.  Well, for Tim one of the biggest sacrifices he made when taking on this lifestyle was leaving behind the music scene where we lived.  Music IS a huge part of his life.  HUGE.  He’s had to adapt to not being able to be a part of several bands.  He hardly played at all in our first year away but in the last two or so years he’s adjusted to playing solo.  In an ideal world he’d want to be playing in several bands but playing solo has been a compromise.  Over the last three weeks he’s been busy making contacts and putting out feelers to get into something here and/or start something new.

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The compromise…. .

For me I have the donkeys!  I’m spending a few mornings a week cleaning up after them and generally enjoying some donkey time.  Mucking out wouldn’t be everyone’s cup of tea but I find it quite therapeutic and of course I love spending time with the donkeys.

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Sunrise over Donkey HQ after a wet night.

One of the things I wanted to do when travelling was to learn a new language or two.  I’d dabbled in French on and off since 2016, did a few months of learning German when we were in Germany and then promptly forgot it all again and ditto last year for Spanish.  Unfortunately, spending an extended period of time in a foreign country doesn’t mean to say you miraculously absorb the language.  Alas, it takes consistent time and effort.  Consistency had never been my strong point regarding languages.  Or anything else for that matter but this lifestyle has forced me into creating a few routines as I know I feel more content if I feel I have achieved something each day whether that be physical or mental.  At the beginning of this year I set myself the challenge to improve my French and I’m glad to say, even though I’m not yet where I want to be with it, I have made some mprovement.  So a consistent effort at continuing to improve the French and learning some Portuguese will be a feature of my day too.

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Time for a cup of tea and a French podcast.

Then we have some dog walking to do.  The AEZA refuge is a non-profit association taking in stray dogs and cats.  Three days a week volunteers are welcome to walk a dog or two.  Tim unwittingly gave me the idea when he said ‘I don’t think it would be a good idea for you to do the dog walking at the dog refuge’.  As a dog lover and having had four of our own dogs in the past he knows I have a weakness for them but when our last one went to the big kennel in the sky in 2013 we agreed we would have a period without the responsibility a dog brings. I’ve done pretty well in sticking to it.  It took all my resolve not to take home half a dozen strays from Greece a couple of years ago.  But, the dogs need walking and I have time on my hands so it was a fait accompli.

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I don’t normally do selfies but needs must………………Gwen enjoying her walk!

I just have to hope I don’t fall in love with one…………or two.

Até já!

And relax…. .

So, we’re currently on a break from ‘vanlife’.  We arrived in Aljezur in the south west of Portugal just over a week ago and we are intending to spend at least four months here.  So, why the extended break here?  We spent two months in this area in 2016/17 and then another two months here in 2018/19 doing some volunteering so got to know the area a little bit during those extended stays.  When we left here at the beginning of February this year to continue our travels we felt like we could have stayed longer but we were also ready to move on.  If that makes sense?  No, I thought not.  I’ll try to explain.

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View across to the new town of Aljezur.

During our two extended stays here we did some volunteering with Sofia who runs a donkey trekking business. It gave us time out of the van, a focus on something other than travel, enjoyable work and a chance to live like a local for a short while.  And of course, for me, spending time with all those donkeys was a super enriching experience.  However, after two months we were ready to live our independent life again but we would have liked to spend a bit longer in the area.  We really like the laid back slow pace of life here and it’s really the only place we have been to since starting our travels where we could see ourselves spending a chunk of time during the winter.  However, at the time we had already made our plans for our trip to Morocco.  We’d organised our Green Card for the insurance on the van in a non EU country and we were looking forward to exploring a new country.  But.  Had we not organised ourselves to go to Morocco we could have easily stayed another month or two in Aljezur either renting a house or staying at the campsite outside the town.  Tim had established a few connections with his music and I was happy to help with the donkeys.

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Cows grazing just at the edge of the town.

We decided, then, to look at the possibilities of renting somewhere in the area during the winter of 2019 to try out an extended stay here but one that was on our own terms where we weren’t volunteering in exchange for accommodation and food.  Going into our fourth year of continuous travel we were ready to stretch out a bit and stay put for a while.  Travelling fulltime can become tiring.  Not in the sense that you feel flaked out all the time but more in a sense of mentally dealing with a life on the move.  Planning where to go to next, taking in new sights and experiences daily, emptying and refilling the van, sorting out laundry every couple of weeks, living cheek by jowl with each other twenty four hours a day!

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In between the old town and new town.

When we embarked on our life change to give up our jobs and do something completely different we viewed it as a new chapter in our lives.  It wasn’t going to be a ‘gap year’ it was going to be more of a ‘gap decade’ to travel to different countries, experience different cultures, experience and learn new things and live in different ways to the norm.  There wasn’t any time limit on it.  We were just going to see how things unfolded and go with whatever felt right at the time.  This little sojourn in Portugal, then, is just a chapter within the chapter. It’s as much a time to recharge and give our brains a rest as it is an opportunity to experience living in another country for an extended period to try it on for size so to speak.

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Lunch in the sun:)

Our travels are far from over but we are ready for a break from them.

So we’ve hunkered down and settled in to our little house on a hill in the old town over the last ten days and we’re looking forward to seeing how it all pans out.

Até logo!

Onwards into Portugal…. .

The great thing about vanlife is that if you arrive somewhere and don’t feel the love for it you can just move on.  Equally, if you do feel the love for somewhere you can stay longer than you’d originally intended.  Marvão, a few kilometres over the border into Portugal was one of those places that waylaid us.  By a week.  We’d intended staying a night or two but……..well…….we couldn’t tear ourselves away.  If we hadn’t needed to be further south by the end of October we would probably have stretched our stay into two weeks.  Or three.  Admittedly we had a spell of warm sunny weather so that always makes a difference.  Pitched up at Asseiceira camping we relaxed into rural life in Portugal.

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Camping Asseiceira.

The hilltop town of Marvão probably is the main attraction for visitors to this area of the Alentejo region of Portugal.

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Marvão.
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The views are superb.

And it is spectacular perched on top of a high peak, but for me it was the rolling, granite bouldered landscape with miles and miles of traffic free lanes to explore on the bike that captured my attention.

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Typical hamlet in this region.

I’d been sadly disillusioned exploring Cornwall by bike whilst we were working on a campsite during the summer by the amount of traffic I had to contend with even on the minor roads.  Everywhere seemed to be rat run to get from one place to another.  In contrast the bike riding around Marvão was completely stress free and practically car free.

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Miles of glorious cycling.

According to Wikipedia the Alentejo region of Portugal covers over 27,000 square kilometres with a population density averaging less than twenty people per square kilometre.  Cornwall on the other hand covers 3,500 square kilometres and during the summer months has a population density of over 12000 people per square kilometre.  Quite a difference then.  Sheesh, no wonder it felt soooo busy in Cornwall.  Anyway, hopefully I’ve got the maths right there as it has never been one of my strengths.

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…….and acorn eating pigs.

So the Alentejo then is a vast area covering a chunk of Portugal which stretches from the Atlantic coast in the west to the Spanish border in the east and the Algarve in the South.  We’d explored some of the south eastern area around Monsaraz in 2016 and really loved it and we weren’t disappointed with the north eastern part either.

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The old station at Beira.

You really can’t beat a hilltop town for a good old exploration on foot.  Marvão at over eight hundred metres is the highest village in the Alentejo.  It is enclosed by 13th Century walls, has a castle at the top where you can walk the walls if you’ve a head for heights, some formal gardens and narrow medieval winding streets lined by white washed houses.  On a good day the panoramic views all around are worth the climb up.

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Walking from the campsite to Marvão.
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It’s gets pretty steep.

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img_20191020_154315904_hdrThe campsite we stayed on is just outside the workaday little town of Santo António das Areias and just under five kilometres from Marvão.

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Cork oaks.
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An early morning walk.

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The view over Castelo de Vide, another historic town in the area.

After a walk or a cycle we enjoyed popping into the mini market everyday for a coffee and a pastel de nata to observe village life in action.  There’s a little cafe inside the mini market with a couple of tables and it seemed to be the hub of the town.

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Simple pleasures.

A steady stream of people would come in, order a coffee, have a chitty chat with whoever happened to be in there at the time, buy a few groceries and then go again.  Everyone seemed to know everyone and happily spent a few minutes chewing the fat.  Barely a mobile phone in sight.  You do have to have a bit of patience or time on your hands when buying your groceries in rural towns and villages in Portugal as no one appears to be in a hurry.  News is swapped and children are cooed over.  We are so used to standing in a queue at a check-out, being served briskly with no one exchanging a word because everyone is in a hurry.  It’s quite the mind set change but a refreshing change at that. 

It felt good to be back in Portugal but time was pressing on so after a week we reluctantly moved on.  Having been brought up by the sea and then spending over twenty years being a two hour drive away from the sea we’re still always drawn to it.  We do like a good coastal walk so after an overnight stop in Évora we spent a few of nights on the Atlantic coast before arriving just over the border into the Algarve for an extended stop. 

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Back on the Atlantic coast near Vila Nova de Milfontes.

img_20191029_114553216_hdrAs regular readers of the blog will know we are swapping van life for bricks and mortar life this winter.    

It will be a chance to take an extended break from travelling and van dwelling to relax, recharge, regroup, reset, reflect and reboot. 

Well that’s the theory anyway. 

We moved out of the van yesterday. 

Time will tell to see how it all pans out and how we get on. 

Até breve!

A hop, skip and a jump across France and Spain…. .

Some days don’t always turn out how you expect them to.  On leaving the chateâu our plan had been to get south of Bordeaux for our first stop.  Unfortunately, the sat nav seemed to be having an ‘off’ day.  After lack of use over several months during the summer I was thinking she was a tad rusty.  She just didn’t want to take us the way I thought she should be taking us.  And she was being really stubborn about it by trying to get us back to where she wanted us to go after I’d over ruled her.  Again.  And again.  And again.  So anyway, after a diversion following a road closure and what seemed like forever we arrived in Cognac well short of our intended first stop.

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Cognac.

Still, Cognac isn’t the worst place we could have ended up in and the aire is just a few metres from the river.  I had thought the quickest route to get us south of Bordeaux avoiding tolls would be via Niort but the sat nav was trying to take us via Poitiers.  On hindsight I should have kept my nose out really and left her to get on with it.  Long story short, and though it pains me to admit it, I think her route via Poitiers would have been better.  Ah well.  I didn’t admit that to Tim until a few days later.  It was baking hot when we arrived in Cognac though so we enjoyed a stroll around the town in the evening.

The following day we did manage to get south of Bordeaux and arrived in the seaside town of Capbreton just before a massive storm.  The sky had been looking ominous for several hours and the heavens opened just as we got parked up at the intermarche.

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It’s not all sunshine and roses you know.

We’d been to Capbreton last year and, as it’s just a short detour from the motorway, it made an ideal stop for the night.  The aire (read: carpark) is directly behind the beach, has electric hook up, water and services and a bread van that visits in the mornings.  €10 a night is all they ask.

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At least the storm blew over for an evenig stroll on the beach at Capbreton.

Fortunately, the aire is fairly sheltered behind the dunes as it lashed down nearly all night.

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The rain came again for most of the night and the next morning though.

Faced with more rain in the morning we were on the road early heading for San Sebastián just over the border into Spain.  The aire in San Sabastián is easy to get to, cheap, quiet and a fifteen minute walk from the seafront.  After visiting for the first time last year we really love it.

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Beach art at San Sebastian.

The town has a really nice vibe to it and we were happy to pass the evening sampling various different Pinxtos, the Basque regions answer to Tapas, in one of the bars.

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Pinxtos (they look fab but in reality they’re a bit too salty and greasy for me).

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img_20191015_173055382_mpEven though we only do about four hours or so of driving per day when we are on the move it does feel like enough.  Having nearly three weeks to get to where we need to be in Southern Portugal we do have time to linger so after four days of driving we pitched up at a campsite twenty kilometres outside Burgos close to a via verde (cycle route on a disused railway) which looked interesting. Tim could swap the driving seat for the saddle for a day.  I’m sure he was thrilled.  No excuses now we have the magic of electric bikes.  Alas, electric bikes don’t shelter you from the rain.  And it was raining again in the morning.  The via verde would have to wait for another time. 

We are both fair weather cyclists.  I don’t mind walking in the rain but I hate cycling in the rain.  We like to think we are quite the ‘outdoorsy’ kind of couple but, in truth, we are quite the ‘indoorsy’ kind of couple when it comes to inclement weather.  We were southern softies before we started our trip and now we are even worse.  We don’t venture out unless it’s dry and at least twenty degrees!  It can be a bit of a hindrance as we have shied away from countries where the temperature is likely to drop into single digits.  I’m looking at you Norway. 

So anyway, the bikes didn’t see the light of day and we were back on the road again heading for Salamanca. 

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Salamanca.

It never ceases to amaze me how inexpensive public transport seems to be everywhere except the UK.  We pitched up for a couple of nights at Don Quijote campsite several kilometres to the east of Salamanca and took the bus into town. At €2.90 return each it was a bargain. 

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Part of the University.

There is a cycleway from the campsite into the city but dodgy weather and the thought in the back of our heads that the bikes might disappear in a large city put paid to that idea.  It’s always in the back of my mind that our bikes are likely to be stolen when left for a few hours in a large city but it doesn’t usually put us off leaving them.  However, knowing that we will be spending four months in Portugal in one place in a couple of weeks time with the bikes as our only form of transport did make me feel a bit precious about them.  It was either that or the fact that I’ve been reading several things about the ‘law of attraction’ recently that made me think if I keep thinking that the bikes are going to be stolen then they probably will be! 

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Museum of Art  Nouveau and Art Deco.

IMG_20191018_113048929_HDR.jpgSalamanca is worth a visit.  It’s quite compact and easy to navigate and explore on foot.  Most of the interesting bits are traffic free giving it a big tick from me.

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The Cathedral.

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Casa de las Conchas – House of the shells.  A symbol of the Order of  Santiago.

The 18th Century square is ‘wow’ inducing even with a book festival being set up in the middle of it. 

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The impressive Plaza Mayor.

IMG_20191018_124802083_HDR.jpgWe stopped in at Cáceres for the night before heading for the border into Portugal. 

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Cáceres

Oh it’s attractive enough but I thought we would be seeing a bit of drama with ‘hanging houses’ perched on rocky outcrops which I’d read about sometime in the dark and distant past.  Obviously if I’d done some research before we arrived I would have realised I’d mixed it up with Cuenca.  Ah well, it’s an easy mistake to make……….maybe. 

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IMG_20191020_121102271_HDR.jpgAnyway, Portugal was on our radar and couldn’t be ignored any longer. 

Hasta luego! 

Time passes très vite at the château…. .

It’s always a risk going somewhere or doing something a second time if you’ve enjoyed your first experience of it.  There’s always the risk that the second time around doesn’t really match up to your expectations or what you were hoping for.  Some things are worth seeing or doing once but you wouldn’t necessarily want to do them again.   We’ve enjoyed all the Helpx’s we have done (some more than others) and they were all worth doing but there are just a few that we have ever considered going back to.  One of them was Donkey HQ in Portugal which we went back to in December last year and another was Chateau de Jalesnes where we are now.

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Helpxing with the donkey’s, Portugal 2018.

There have been rewards and frustrations with all the Helpx’s we have done so far.  I think we have stayed with seven different hosts and, other than Donkey HQ where we stayed two months, we have spent between three and four weeks at a time with a host.

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Helpxing on Jan and Dave’s smallholding in the UK, 2016.

Helpx involves staying with a host (generally a couple or a family) and doing, on average, four hours a day in exchange for accommodation and food.  The types of opportunities you can apply for range from helping out on farms, smallholdings, B&B’s, backpacker’s hostels, summer camps, language exchanges and the like.  They all vary and what the host expect varies as well although they are all supposed to follow the guidelines outlined on the Helpx website.

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The Dairy Farm, Germany 2017.

Generally you live with the host in their home although some hosts provide separate accommodation.  As you can imagine living with other people in their home can be challenging sometimes especially when you are on the mature side like us!  Despite the challenges though we’ve always laughed our way through them and we would still say that all the Helpx opportunities we have done have been worth doing, we’ve learnt loads and we’ve been able to have a go at things that we would never be employed to do without some experience.  I mean no-one was ever going to pay us to be let loose with forty four alpacas without some sort of certificate in Alpaca care were they?

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The Alpacas, Germany 2017.

So, after that rambling introduction, was coming back to Chateau de Jalesnes a second time and committing to staying nearly four week’s worth it?  Absolutely.  I think we can say we have enjoyed our time here more the second time around.  The balance between work and free time has been spot on.

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Free time for a bit of relaxation.

After the wedding the first weekend we were here, when it was all a bit manic, things quietened down considerably as the season came to a close.  The guests have been few but there is still work to be done but it’s not been all go at the chateau.  I mean, it’s not a holiday, you do have to work every day but our hosts, Jenny and David, are exceptional and have just left us to get on with things at our own pace.

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Alex, our Brazilian helper mowing in the rain with great panache.

There’s always something to do either inside or outside. After the wedding guests had left all the beds needed making.  Fortunately, there are a couple of ladies who come in to clean the apartments after an event so we just needed to make the beds.  It was a lot of beds but we had quite a good system going and managed pretty well.

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Who would have thought Tim would be making beds?

Thank the Lord for fitted sheets and whoever invented duvets with slits in the top corners to yank the top of the duvet through is a genius.

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Ta Dah!

We’ve had plenty of free time to ‘do our own thing’ and have had access to the chateau car for trips out.

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Saumur chateau.

I have to confess we’ve not been out a great deal as generally the weather has been poor but also we have been happy to potter about with our own interests during our free time.

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Cafe culture was more enticing than Saumur chateau though.

We’ve frequented one of the local bars in the village a couple of times and were made to feel really welcome.

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When in France…………..
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Challenging the locals to a game of darts.

Tim went along to a local band a couple of times and was made to feel really welcome and I think they were a bit disappointed he wasn’t in the area longer.  I’m not sure Tim was too disappointed though!

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The local band.

We’ve been invited at least twice a week to eat with Jenny and David, our hosts, and Tim has been able to play at a couple of them.

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An evening with our hosts.
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An impromtu ‘Summertime’ from the brides Mum on the last night they were at the chateau.
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Not a bad view.

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Homemade Lamingtons – an Austalian sponge cake rolled in chocolate and coconut.
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A fish and chip night at an English owned bar at one of the nearby villages.

It suits us here as the volunteers are housed in an outbuilding in the garden of the chateau which is affectionately known as the ‘Hi-De-Hi’.

img_20191008_185309960_hdr Anyone middle aged living in the UK will understand why.

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The Hi-De-Hi cast from the 1980’s comedy series.

We’ve shared the Hi-De-Hi with Alex from Brazil and Jigmy from the U.S. who have both been considerate house mates.

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Alex just before he left with his homemade bag made from rope and clingfilm!
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Jigmy.

We are given a weekly allowance each to buy food at the local supermarket and we can just shop for whatever we want and put it on the Chateau tab.

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Tim. Super U. 2019
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Tim. The same Super U. 2016!

We all shopped separately and cooked for ourselves which suited me as on other Helpx’s I’ve ended up doing a fair amount of cooking which takes quite a lot of time and can be a bit tedious if all I really wanted was a sandwich.

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A baguette and cheese does us for lunch.

All the people who had worked at the chateau throughout the season were invited to a lunch as a thank you for all their hard work.

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Retrieving the chairs from a cave in the moat.

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Jenny supervising the caterers!
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The big clean up after.
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Pretty in pink.

The Hi-De-Hi was in need of a freshen up so we were tasked with doing just that.  Now, decorating wouldn’t normally be my kind of fun activity but as the weather had been pretty grim since the wedding guests had left I was quite happy to have an indoor project that would keep us going for several days.

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Painting the Hi-De-Hi.

We’ve managed to get the walls and ceilings done in the three bedrooms, the living room, kitchen and bathroom and we’ll leave all the window frames and doors to the next Helpxer’s.

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Voila!
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Room with a view.

So our time here Helpxing at Chateau de Jalesnes has come to an end and it’s time to hit the road again.

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We hadn’t realised there was a donkey at the neighbours next door until a couple of days ago.  Doh!

Thank you to Jenny and David for hosting us again and being such great hosts.  We’ve been here almost four weeks and it really only feels like two but we’re ready for the next chapter in our travels.

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Au revoir.

We’ve decided not to dilly dally in France for too long so we are heading  towards San Sebastian in Northern Spain as it feels like time for a new country and culture.  We spent a few days in San Sebastian about the same time last year but it had turned really really really cold so we’re hoping this time we can experience it with a bit of sunshine and warmth.

Here’s hoping.

À bientôt!

Escape to the Château… .

So, we’ve been in France more than a week already.  The time has shot past.  We love France as it is sooooo motorhome friendly.  We had a couple of days of relaxation before we were due to arrive at our next Helpx.  We headed straight for the Pays de la Loire region as that is the area we’ll be volunteering in until the middle of October.  We parked up in a little aire just a stones throw from the river Mayenne in the little village of Grez-Neuville just twenty kilometres north west of Angers.

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A free aire by the river in Grez-Neuville.

The aire was free, the sun was out and with a cycle path along the river in either direction it was the perfect place to wind down after our few months working at the campsite.

 

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View round the corner from the aire.

We have visited the  Pays de la Loire region several times over the years and really like it.  Away from the cities it’s a tranquil place to be.

 

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Grez-Neuville.

We took a leisurely bike ride north along the river in the direction of Château-Gontier.

 

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Bikes are well catered for.  There were even charging points for electric bikes.

Within minutes of starting our cycle we were waylaid by these guys.

 

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http://www.savonnerie-lait-anesse.fr

Oh, how happy was I to get some hands on donkey time again.  There must have been about twenty or so of them.  The couple that own them make and sell soaps, shampoo and cremes from the milk of the donkeys.

 

IMG_20190917_113618957_HDR.jpgWe first came across this breed of donkey, les baudet du Poitou, when we were visiting the Ile de Ré in 2016.  They are an endangered breed and the couple, when they created their business, chose the Piotou to help to save the breed.

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Modern France today…….a machine replaces the boulangerie:(

Anyway, as the title of this blog post hints at we are back at Chateau de Jalesnes for a few weeks.

 

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Château de Jalesnes.

 

Some of the long term readers may remember we spent a few weeks here in May 2016.  It was the second Helpx of our trip and we’ve been meaning to come back again but have never quite fitted it in.  Well, now we are back and we are really pleased to be here.  It’s like we have never been away.

 

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The view out back!

There have been some further improvements and the chateau now has about seventeen apartments and is becoming established as a popular wedding venue.  A couple of years ago it was featured on the Channel 4 series ‘Escape to the Chateau’.

 

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It was wedding fever over the weekend.

We were fortunate to be a part of the last wedding of this season over the weekend.  An English couple commandeered the whole chateau for the weekend with just over one hundred guests.

 

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All my own work!

The chateau can accommodate fifty or so guests so some were staying in the local area.  It was a lot of work.

 

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The tables only took about five hours to set up.

Rooms to prepare, lawns to mow, bars to be set up, chairs and tables to be put out blah blah blah.

 

 

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The jumbo bath with a view in the Clock Tower.

Alex (a helper from Brazil) and Tim manned the bar on Friday and Saturday night.

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It’s the first time Tim has ever done barwork!

Everything went according to plan and it was great to be involved.  A three minute deluge of rain in between the cheeses and the dessert where everyone got soaked didn’t seem to matter and I expect everyone will remember it for a long time to come!

 

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Here comes the bride.

We finally got into bed at 4.00am on the Saturday night.  It’s the latest I’d been to bed in a couple of decades that’s for sure!

À bientôt!

 

 

 

Voila……..finally…….an update….

Ha. Le. Lul. Jah.

So, I’ve finally sat myself down, given myself a stern talking to and got on with writing a blog post.  To say the blog has been neglected in recent months is an understatement.  When we arrived back in Spain from Morocco, urm, five months ago I had decided to have a break from the blog for a couple of weeks or so.  Mmm.   Oh, it’s been in the back of my mind all along.  Way back.  But I’ve never quite managed to update it.  Until now.  I should have known myself really.  Give myself and inch……

So, what’s been happening chez Bonvanageblog?

Well, first and foremost we are well into season four of our midlife crisis decision to turn our lives upside down and try something new.  I will write something fairly soon on our thoughts after three and a half years of living differently.  It would be a stretch too far to expect that in this blog post though.  Instead, I’ll get us up to speed on what we have been up to, where we are now and what our plans are going forward.

After spending nearly three months in Morocco we landed back in Algeciras, Spain and of course headed straight for Gib.  The pull of pork pies and fish and chips was just too much to ignore.  It felt both bizarre and freeing to be back in Europe.  Bizarre to be back to all things familiar and freeing to know I could wander around by myself without attracting any attention.

Our final stop at Chefchaouen before we left Morocco brought it home to me that I take my freedom to roam at will, on my own, wherever I want in Europe for granted.   Admittedly Chefchaouen was the only place in Morocco where I felt a little uncomfortable but looking back it was the only place really other than a bike ride that I’d gone out on my own without Tim.

Women out alone in Morocco are not really a thing or part of the culture so being back in Spain felt a bit liberating for me.  Tim just had his eyes on the pork pies!  Gib did let us down on the fish and chip front though.  Batter the texture of inner soles.  Soo disappointing.

The Cabo de Gata National Park, east of Almeria, is somewhere we’ve been meaning to visit for ages so we headed there from Gib with the intention of exploring the whole area for a few weeks.  We didn’t spare the horses and took the quickest route along the E15 to get there.  What we saw along the route is all a blur in my memory until we got into the province of Almeria.

Plastic greenhouses.  As far as the eye can see.  We knew they would be there as we’d been told about them from other travellers.  But.  It is vast.  Just vast.  Vaster than vast.  So vast you can barely take it in.  One hundred and sixty five square miles of them.  Whole towns are swallowed up by them.

Here are a few images from Google to give you an idea if you’ve never seen them before.

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Plastic Greenhouses as far as the eye can see.

And an article here if you’re interested.  The Cabo de Gata is a protected area but that pesky plastic has edged right up to the boundary.

We arrived in the pretty whitewashed town of San Jose not really feeling the love for the area.  In truth, we were a bit travelled out after Morocco and needed a bit of downtime.  We stayed on two different aires for a couple of weeks.  And did……………nothing.  Rien.  Nada.  We just didn’t have the enthusiasm.  Travel is tiring and we’d peaked in Morocco.  Our heads were back in the UK even though we had another three weeks left in Spain.  It’s hard to shake that feeling when it arrives so we just accept it.  Instead we enjoyed the sunshine, did a few easy walks here and there and not much else.

We found our mojo again taking a week or so to drive up through Spain following more or less the same route as 2017. Ubeda, Toledo, Avila, Palencia.   Each day provides a different landscape.  Olives.  Prairies.  Mountains.   The roads are toll free and quiet.  It was all stress free.  Well it was until we got a text to say our ferry from Santander had been cancelled.  Oh joy.

The ferry had something wrong with it and was going to be out of action for a couple of weeks so revised plans were drawn up.  If we still wanted to travel back from Spain we would have had to wait a week which would have been a bit inconvenient as we’d already planned our itinerary back in the UK seeing family, friends and dentists etc.  So, we hoofed it up through France in a couple of jumps and came back to Portsmouth via Caen.

With family and friends and appointments done we headed back down to Lanyon Holiday Park in Cornwall at the beginning of June to help out during their busiest months.

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Arrival day, basking in sunshine.

We slotted back in as if we’d never been away.

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Tim was happy to get back to the boys toys.

img_20190608_131237456_hdrThe weather didn’t let us down.  June was cold, July was not bad and August was hideous until the bank holiday.  The same as last year really!

What did make our lives much easier this year were our bikes.  Our bikes are no longer just bikes.  They are e-bikes.  Ah, what a difference they’ve made to us this summer.  We’d ummed and ahhed about going electric for several months looking at all the different options.  Do we sell ours?  Buy electric specific bikes?   Get ours adapted?  Long story short we had our existing ones adapted and they are just Fab.  With a capital F.  Fab.

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An overnight trip to see friends near lands end.  

They’ve made such a difference to our time in Cornwall and I can’t wait to get them out in Europe.

Plans for this year?  Well, we’re currently sitting at the ferry port in Plymouth awaiting the ferry for France.  We’ll be spending at least a month in France.  We’re going back to one of the places we volunteered at in 2016.  Then………. Portugal.  It’s going to be an experimental year this year.  We’re going to spend four months in Aljezur, Portugal from the beginning of November.  We’ll be renting a house there to see how staying put for the bulk of the winter works out.

After that?

We’re not sure.

We’ll have to see what the Boris Brexit Brings.

Laters!